Isabella

Isabella

The Warrior Queen

Book - 2014
Average Rating:
6
Rate this:
Drawing on new scholarship, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Woman Behind the New Deal presents a biography of Isabella of Castile, the controversial Queen of Spain who sponsored Christopher Columbus' journey to the New World, established the Spanish Inquisition and became one of the most influential female rulers in history.
Publisher: New York :, Nan A. Talese/Doubleday,, [2014]
Edition: First edition
ISBN: 9780385534116
0385534116
Characteristics: x, 520 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color), maps ; 25 cm
Alternative Title: Warrior queen

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

l
Logovore
May 14, 2015

Isabella was a very complex individual during a very turbulent time. She did some things that place her in the hero column and others (or presided over others) that so definitely put her in the villain column. This is a well-executed exploration of the woman, the queen and her milieu.

s
StarGladiator
Mar 28, 2015

Can't dispute any of the historicity of the author, who has done a marvelous job of research and thoughtful analysis of Isabella, just never cared for the mass murder which was generated from her reign. She combined the asset forfeiture and CIA illegal torture into one operation of her day, her Inquisition, which funded many an expedition, which led to the slaughter of millions. Definitely Machiavellian in nature. Great book as accurate historical biography.

g
GummiGirl
Mar 27, 2015

Makes a good case for Isabella as the founder of an empire, without hiding her less admirable qualities. Its other chief protagonists include Rodrigo Borgia (Pope Alexander VI) and Christopher Columbus.

ChristchurchLib Jan 12, 2015

When Europe was beginning its transition from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, one of the most powerful monarchs was Isabella I of Castile. Though she's typically named second in the pair "Ferdinand and Isabella," she was queen in her own right, unifying Spain in an era of frequent wars, banishing Moors and Jews who refused to convert to Catholicism, and funding Columbus' voyages to the Western Hemisphere. In Isabella, historian Kirstin Downey demonstrates why she was one of the most significant women in history. This detailed, engaging portrait displays "Isabella's fingerprints on Renaissance culture and religion" (Publishers Weekly). History and Current Events January 2015 newsletter.

ChristchurchLib Jan 12, 2015

When Europe was beginning its transition from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, one of the most powerful monarchs was Isabella I of Castile. Though she's typically named second in the pair "Ferdinand and Isabella," she was queen in her own right, unifying Spain in an era of frequent wars, banishing Moors and Jews who refused to convert to Catholicism, and funding Columbus' voyages to the Western Hemisphere. In Isabella, historian Kirstin Downey demonstrates why she was one of the most significant women in history. This detailed, engaging portrait displays "Isabella's fingerprints on Renaissance culture and religion" (Publishers Weekly). History and Current Events January 2015 newsletter.

f
FRR
Jan 01, 2015

For the record, her name was not "Isabella" but Isabel. Apparently rare is the Spanish name other than Maria that British and American authors and media announcers can manage to get right.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at CSM

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top