Early Art of the Southeastern Indians

Early Art of the Southeastern Indians

Feathered Serpents & Winged Beings

Book - 2004
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Univ of Georgia Press
Presenting artifacts originating in the Archaic through the Mississippian periods—from thousands of years ago through A.D. 1600—Power introduces us to an extraordinary assortment of ceremonial and functional objects that offer clues to their creators’ widening awareness of their physical and spiritual worlds.

Book News
Unusual for its depth of research and analysis, this volume presents a history of the art and archaeology of the peoples living in what is now the southeast US from prehistoric times to the 17th century. Much of the volume is devoted to the sites of the Mississippian culture and the works of metal, ceramic, wood, and textile that have been found there. Discussion is included on the Serpent Mound, the Rock Eagle Effigy Mound, Cahokia Mounds, and other major sites. In detailed chapters, Power (art , Marshall U., Huntington, West Virginia) discusses the history of study of each site, the symbolism of the works recovered, the possible uses of the work, and ritual practice. A chapter is included on the artist and artistic practice. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Blackwell North Amer
<p><i>Early Art of the Southeastern Indians</i> is a visual journey through time, highlighting some of the most skillfully created art in native North America. The remarkable objects described and pictured here, many in full color, reveal the hands of master artists who developed lapidary and weaving traditions, established centers for production of shell and copper objects, and created the first ceramics in North America.</p><p>Presenting artifacts originating in the Archaic through the Mississippian periods&mdash;from thousands of years ago through A.D. 1600&mdash;Susan C. Power introduces us to an extraordinary assortment of ceremonial and functional objects, including pipes, vessels, figurines, and much more. Drawn from every corner of the Southeast&mdash;from Louisiana to the Ohio River valley, from Florida to Oklahoma&mdash;the pieces chronicle the emergence of new media and the mastery of new techniques as they offer clues to their creators’ widening awareness of their physical and spiritual worlds.</p><p>The most complex works, writes Power, were linked to male (and sometimes female) leaders. Wearing bold ensembles consisting of symbolic colors, sacred media, and richly complex designs, the leaders controlled large ceremonial centers that were noteworthy in regional art history, such as Etowah, Georgia; Spiro, Oklahoma; Cahokia, Illinois; and Moundville, Alabama. Many objects were used locally; others circulated to distant locales.</p><p>Power comments on the widening of artists’ subjects, starting with animals and insects, moving to humans, then culminating in supernatural combinations of both, and she discusses how a piece’s artistic “language” could function as a visual shorthand in local style and expression, yet embody an iconography of regional proportions. The remarkable achievements of these southeastern artists delight the senses and engage the mind while giving a brief glimpse into the rich, symbolic world of feathered serpents and winged beings.</p>

Publisher: Athens : University of Georgia Press, c2004
ISBN: 9780820325019
0820325015
Characteristics: xii, 254 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 29 cm

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